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One More Rock Organ Lesson from Keyboard Magazine

Rock Organ Credibility on the B-3 Here’s another lesson I did for Jon Regen and Keyboard Magazine back in 2011 about my favorite topic, the mighty Hammond B-3. I play so much rock organ on “Conan”, and these are some of my tricks, as best I could describe them–so much of this style is by feel and hard to explain. I think I recorded the audio examples on the set during a union break. (click here for the original article) 3 Steps To Rock Organ Cred By Scott Healy Sun, 1 May 2011 As a working keyboardist, sooner or later…

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Looking for a New Venue for the Ellington Study Group

http://www.ellingtonstudygroup.com/

We’re looking for a new venue for the Ellington Study Group. Please respond or leave a comment if you have any ideas. Possibilities include my house, your house, a club, a hall, the musician’s union… We don’t necessarily discuss Duke Ellington’s work, in fact the last few classes have ranged in topics from Kansas City small group arranging to Sammy Nestico, Thad Jones and Gil Evans. Info on the class: Ellington Study Group Los Angeles The Ellington Study Group is organized and led by composer and pianist Scott Healy, and is open to all music professionals. The group is intended…

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Again with the Linear Harmony? Too dry….

Linear Harmony #5: Block and Layered Counterpoint This is a new blog post at professorscosco – it’s dry as a bone but you composers will get the point. If you want an enjoyable read and fun content go read the Huffington Post. Click for the original article. I’m revising a piece for my ensemble, perhaps for a recording in the near or far future. I’ve used “Take it Inside” in many posts because it’s a good example of linear harmony. It’s also free and I have the score. During the process of taking this tune apart I’ve seen many missed…

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The Score: Jazz Scores after the Jazz Age After having watched Mike Hammer, My Gun is Quick (1957) on youtube, the interwebs led me to the below post from Hearing the Movies, a really cool blog by Jim Buhler, David Neumeyer and Rob Deemer. The opening credit sequence is the first installment of Marlin Skiles’ jazz score: a really cool big band piece, with a drum solo (what! say it isn’t so!)…turns out that Skiles was a prolific composer and arranger, and his jazz-noire score for this film rivals my all time favorite, Elmer Bernstein and Chico Hamilton’s Sweet Smell of…

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Repost: Blues for Pablo: True to Form

 Yes, it’s another retread…the following is a popular post from my other blog: What do you call this…something like “orchestrational and harmonic gestural writing”, or “tonal consequence”, or even “temporal textural tautological antiphony”?…maybe you just mean “music”. “Blues for Pablo”–True to Form Posted on October 8, 2011 by Scott Healy View the original article at professorscosco.com.   Blues for Pablo is to me the best piece of music on the great Miles Davis/Gil Evans 1958 record Miles Ahead (also titled Miles +19.) It’s a rich and detailed work. Gil’s techniques–transparent orchestration,  use of instruments such as alto flute, french horns, tuba and…

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B-3 Basics for Pianists

Here’s another reprint of a lesson from Keyboard from a few years ago. Despite quite a few musical typos (blame the copyist), you’ll get the idea. Many past lessons are available at the Keyboard Magazine website , so check them all out online, not just the ones I did. If you buy Keyboard on the stands you’ll notice that the print edition’s wide format makes the lessons look particularity great. The basic idea of this lesson is that no matter how good a pianist or keyboardist you are, there are some trademark and non-intuitive techniques you need to know, and…

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