Welcome to Scott Healy's website - please check back for updates and new music. close ×
+

Boogie Down – Keyboard Magazine Lesson from 11/10

Triple Threat Jazz Composer review-Hudson City Suite

This is a reprint of a lesson I did for Keyboard Magazine in the November, 2010 issue. Here I’m swinging the boogie, more of a Chicago blues style; the “original” boogie feel had a much straighter feel. But the same principles apply. I’d say that on the job we swing more than not, so here it is: Boogie Down by Scott Healy Click for the original article online. Before rock ’n’ roll, there was boogie-woogie. Without boogie, we wouldn’t have Little Richard, Johnnie Johnson, or Jerry Lee Lewis — or half of New Orleans piano music and most of the…

Read more

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

Keyboard Magazine Jazz Lesson 12/13 – “One Note Jazz”

Triple Threat Jazz Composer review-Hudson City Suite

Add One Note, Get Jazz By Scott Healy Wed, 25 Dec 2013 rss It’s a rewarding challenge for me to write a jazz lesson for rock players or classical composers who want to extend harmony and/or voice a chord on piano. I have to “break it down” – but what I always see is how the principles of jazz harmony are an accessible and, dare I say, easy to understand. Making it complex doesn’t help anyone except the textbook publishers. Take it step by step, work on it a little, incorporate it into your work, and eventually it will take….

Read more

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

“Jazz Inside” Magazine – Scott Healy Interview – September, 2013

Scott Healy-Jazz Inside Interview

<ed: In the print edition the author mistakenly describes me as “Musical Director on the Conan O’Brien Show on network TV.” We all know that my good friend, the brilliant Jimmy V is the MD, and Conan is decidedly not on network TV. Do your homework Joe!> Scott Healy – Interview by Joe Patitucci JI: What are some of the lessons you’ve learned about business and the music business in your travels as studio musician, touring sideman, and or independent artist? SH: I think the most important lesson I’ve learned about business is to try to establish strong personal relationships…

Read more

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

One More Rock Organ Lesson from Keyboard Magazine

Rock Organ Credibility on the B-3 Here’s another lesson I did for Jon Regen and Keyboard Magazine back in 2011 about my favorite topic, the mighty Hammond B-3. I play so much rock organ on “Conan”, and these are some of my tricks, as best I could describe them–so much of this style is by feel and hard to explain. I think I recorded the audio examples on the set during a union break. (click here for the original article) 3 Steps To Rock Organ Cred By Scott Healy Sun, 1 May 2011 As a working keyboardist, sooner or later…

Read more

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

Again with the Linear Harmony? Too dry….

Linear Harmony #5: Block and Layered Counterpoint This is a new blog post at professorscosco – it’s dry as a bone but you composers will get the point. If you want an enjoyable read and fun content go read the Huffington Post. Click for the original article. I’m revising a piece for my ensemble, perhaps for a recording in the near or far future. I’ve used “Take it Inside” in many posts because it’s a good example of linear harmony. It’s also free and I have the score. During the process of taking this tune apart I’ve seen many missed…

Read more

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

Repost: Blues for Pablo: True to Form

 Yes, it’s another retread…the following is a popular post from my other blog: What do you call this…something like “orchestrational and harmonic gestural writing”, or “tonal consequence”, or even “temporal textural tautological antiphony”?…maybe you just mean “music”. “Blues for Pablo”–True to Form Posted on October 8, 2011 by Scott Healy View the original article at professorscosco.com.   Blues for Pablo is to me the best piece of music on the great Miles Davis/Gil Evans 1958 record Miles Ahead (also titled Miles +19.) It’s a rich and detailed work. Gil’s techniques–transparent orchestration,  use of instruments such as alto flute, french horns, tuba and…

Read more

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

1 2 3